Burning Blue

(Note: If you're visiting from the 24 Squadron Association site, the link you want is actually here.  Enjoy the stories!)

The name "Burning Blue" comes from two sources.

The first is the much-loved and profoundly inspiring pilot's poem, High Flight, by John Gillespie Magee.  Magee was an American who crossed the border into Canada so that he could join the Royal Canadian Air Force ahead of America's joining World War II.  He became a Spitfire pilot, rose to the rank of Pilot Officer, and was killed in a midair collision on 11 December 1941.

The other is, of course, IBM, fondly known as Big Blue, the biggest computer company in the world.  IBM is a company, but its influence on the industry has been so pervasive that it seems more appropriate to describe it as an institution. With three Nobel Prizes for Physics, its own peer-reviewed journal and its own particle accelerator, IBM is a research institution of enormous standing, and has been responsible for virtually every major technological advance in the history of computing.  The IBM mainframe computer, affectionately referred to as Big Iron, remains the gold standard for high-end business computing.

And with trailblazing breakthroughs like the first ever image of a molecule and the incomprehensible computing speeds of the smashed petaflops barrier, IBM continues to hurtle into the future.

Sir Isaac Newton reputedly said: "If I see further than other men, it is because I stand upon the shoulders of giants."

In the IT industry, IBM is the giant on whose shoulders we all stand.

Perhaps, given the project's focus on raising funds for climate change-related disaster relief, there is a third meaning to our name: our beautiful blue planet, the only home we have, is burning. 

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